August 26, 2014   13 notes

fantagraphics:

This weekend, Eleanor Davis and Ed Piskor are going to rock Georgia’s lit festival in Decatur. Free to the public on Saturday, August 30th and Sunday, August 31st, the Decatur Book Festival is all over downtown Decatur. 

Eleanor is giving a presentation along with Liz Prince and moderator Kerry Leibling at the How to Be Graphic” panel on Saturday, August 30th. A little less salty than it sounds, be at the Marriott Conference Center Ballroom A promptly at 1:45pm! (130 Clairemont Ave, Decatur, GA 30030) A book signing to follow.
 
Meanwhile, on Sunday Ed Piskor has the Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2 - Book Launch at 5pm. Along with moderator Edward A. Hall, Piskor will talk about the jump hip-hop has made from legends to comic book panels. Join him at Marriott Conference Center Ballroom. (130 Clairemont Ave, Decatur, GA 30030)A book signing to follow.
 
So we’ll see you, DECATUR, this weekend! 

Good stuff!

August 21, 2014   83 notes
nprfreshair:

 Maureen Corrigan reviews the new graphic novel from Jules Feiffer:

The title, Kill My Mother, has about as much subtlety as a migraine, but Jules Feiffer isn’t going for subtlety in this, his first graphic novel.  Instead, he’s going for ricocheting bullets, imploding nuclear families, knuckle sandwiches, booze, broads, and paranoia gone ballistic. In short, at the ripe old age of 85, Feiffer has returned to the seedy comic strips, hard-boiled novels and B movies of his youth: this time out, he’s going for noir.


I can’t wait to read the new book by the great Jules Feiffer. BUT - let the record show  - this is NOT, as Corrigan states and the NYT Book Review cover story implied - this is not Feiffer’s first graphic novel. Ok, this may be his first historical GN, or some variation upon a historical, pulp, or detective graphic novel. But his 1980ish graphic novel Tantrum is one of my very favorites… It’s the cartoon saga of a fifty or sixty something guy who chooses to return to life as a little baby… With the dialogue and chutzpah of his real age. Don’t miss any Feiffer, any chance you get.

nprfreshair:

 Maureen Corrigan reviews the new graphic novel from Jules Feiffer:

The title, Kill My Mother, has about as much subtlety as a migraine, but Jules Feiffer isn’t going for subtlety in this, his first graphic novel.  Instead, he’s going for ricocheting bullets, imploding nuclear families, knuckle sandwiches, booze, broads, and paranoia gone ballistic. In short, at the ripe old age of 85, Feiffer has returned to the seedy comic strips, hard-boiled novels and B movies of his youth: this time out, he’s going for noir.

I can’t wait to read the new book by the great Jules Feiffer. BUT - let the record show - this is NOT, as Corrigan states and the NYT Book Review cover story implied - this is not Feiffer’s first graphic novel. Ok, this may be his first historical GN, or some variation upon a historical, pulp, or detective graphic novel. But his 1980ish graphic novel Tantrum is one of my very favorites… It’s the cartoon saga of a fifty or sixty something guy who chooses to return to life as a little baby… With the dialogue and chutzpah of his real age. Don’t miss any Feiffer, any chance you get.

August 21, 2014   53 notes
oldflorida:

Holly Hill Florida, the first place shuffleboard was played on land in the USA, in 1913.

I miss shuffleboard. If anybody near Atlanta Ga knows a court, or a miniature golf course… I’ll take you on.

oldflorida:

Holly Hill Florida, the first place shuffleboard was played on land in the USA, in 1913.

I miss shuffleboard. If anybody near Atlanta Ga knows a court, or a miniature golf course… I’ll take you on.

August 21, 2014   116 notes

comixology:

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland #1

Walking long-legged beds and menageries of strange creatures, a face in the moon and candy-made kids! Nemo is back and walking the dreamscape, however reluctantly, in Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland #1.

First published in the New York Herald in 1905, Winsor McCay’s celebrated strip Little Nemo in Slumberland is a classic. It’s been adapted into various media including an animated film in 1989 that, I admit, terrified me as a child. The story follows young Nemo’s fantastic adventures when called into Slumberland by King Morpheus. Here too is where we meet Nemo afresh as he’s commanded to become the playmate of Slumberland’s princess. However, it’s not easy to get to the land of dreams when all of your progress is lost upon falling out of bed.

Locke & Key's artist Gabriel Rodriguez’s (gr-comicsdetailed architecture and stylization remains faithful to McCay’s art nouveau influences with decorative flourishes and nods to the original jaunty layouts. Meanwhile, writer Eric Shanower is a wonderful fit what with his work on Marvel’s Oz books; he’s no stranger to giving a great voice to kids finding themselves in bizarre new lands. This team works well together in bringing their own touch while keeping that quintessential Nemo look and feel. The story is a whimsical ride with surprises around every corner and as unpredictable as our own dreamtime escapades. Its unfettered pacing flows surreally as it never would in waking hours.

While sure to be a hit for all ages and a great jumping off point for new and old fans alike, if you need more journeys into imagination then try Marvel’s Figment.

Don’t wait for bedtime to explore dreamland when you join Nemo on his nightly romps through Slumberland. Happy reading and pleasant dreams!

[Read Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland #1]

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and could really use a nap herself right about now.

I don’t think I could come up with a better #comicsforyourkids pick to come out this week than this.

I read this remarkable pastiche today, and can recommend it wholeheartedly. If you love Little Nemo, Winsor McCay, or Eric Shanower, you will love this, too.

(via idwcomics)

August 21, 2014   7 notes
August 14, 2014   675 notes
August 12, 2014   64 notes

muspeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

Do you ever talk to your pets? Legend has it that St. Francis of Assisi spent a lot of his time talking to animals he met on his travels. Bread and Puppet Theater’s charming St. Francis Preaches to the Birds recounts the story of Francis preaching to a flock of birds he meets one day. 

The Masonite relief cuts and text were done by Peter Schumann. The hand-coloring of the images was done by Solveig Schumann and Kaja McGowan. Claire Van Vliet designed and printed the book at Janus Press in 1978. 

This copy of the text was generously donated to Special Collections this past summer by New York book collector Jerry Buff. 

Gorgeous block prints!

Bread and Puppet theater… in a beautiful book.

August 12, 2014   1,147 notes

todaysdocument:

Robin Williams (1951-2014)

Actor, Comedian, Friend to the USO and the troops

Comedian and actor Robin Williams shakes hands with US Army (USA) CHIEF Warrant Office Two (WO2) Davis, 4th Infantry Division (ID) at Kirkuk Air Base (AB), Iraq (IRQ). Mr. Williams is in Kirkuk as part of the USO (United Service Organization) tour traveling through Southwest Asia with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of STAFF (JCS) during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, 12/17/2003

Robin Williams, a comedian and an actor, performs for troops during a United Services Organization (USO) visit at the Base Exchange at Camp Victory, Baghdad, Iraq, on Dec. 14, 2004. (USAF PHOTO by SENIOR AIRMAN Christopher A. Marasky) (Released), 12/14/2004

Actor/Comedian Robin Williams entertains the crew of US Navy (USN) ENTERPRISE CLASS: Aircraft Carrier, USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65), during a holiday special hosted by the United Service Organization (USO), during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, 12/19/2003

Actor/Comedian Robin Williams (center) visits with Ohio (OH), Air National Guard (ANG) Technical Sergeant (TSGT), Chuck Juhasz, during his visit to the 39th Medical Group (MG), Hospital at Incirlik Air Base (AB), Turkey, during Operation NORTHERN WATCH. USAF Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jerome Limoge, Surgeon, 39th Medical Group looks on, 10/14/2002

 

God bless, rest, and keep Robin Williams.

August 12, 2014   101 notes
June 2, 2014   31,153 notes
"Arf! Arf! Arf!" (Popeye the Sailor Man)

"Arf! Arf! Arf!" (Popeye the Sailor Man)

(Source: , via rubberhoseanimation)